Perspectives

2013 Technology disruptors and enablers

A consumer products perspective

For the consumer products goods (CPG) manufacturer, the technology landscape is as compelling as ever, with technology trends offering new sets of tools to tackle emerging and persistent challenges. The trends can enable CPG organizations to be more effective, insightful, collaborative, and efficient. Some organizations will up the ante to create new capabilities and even new operating models. ​

Disruptors for consumer products 

Opportunities that can create sustainable positive disruption in IT capabilities, business operations and sometimes even business models. ​

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CIO as the post digital catalyst

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CIO as the post digital catalyst

CIOs can lead the move to tomorrow, reshaping business as usual and driving innovation. On the one hand, they face unprecedented opportunity for innovation. On the other: the existential threat of disruption. How should business respond? And who better to lead than the CIO?

When CIOs harness the convergence of the five postdigital forces, they can change the conversation from systems to capabilities and from technical issues to business impact. Plan big, start small, fail fast, scale appropriately.​

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​Mobile only (and beyond)

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​​Mobile only (and beyond)

Mobile should be top of mind for organizations. But don’t limit your ideas to Mobile First. Think Mobile Only, imagining an untethered, connected enterprise.

The next wave of mobile may fundamentally reshape operations, businesses, and marketplaces, delivering information and services to where decisions are made and transactions occur. And the potential goes far beyond smartphones and tablets to include voice, gesture and location-based interactions; device convergence; digital identity in your pocket; and pervasive mobile computing.

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Social reengineering by design

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Social reengineering by design

Businesses are no longer building technologies just to enable interaction. They are now engineering social platforms for specific context, platforms that can relieve rather than serve traditional organizational constraints such as deep hierarchies, command-and-control cultures, physical proximity, and resource concentration.

Social reengineering can fundamentally transform how work gets done, but it isn’t just a “project.” It’s a strategy. And it’s not serendipity. It’s intentional–by design.​

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Design as a discipline

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Design as a discipline

Driven by consumer experience, intuitiveness and simplicity are moving from IT aspirations to enterprise mandates. Design is not a phase; it’s a way of thinking. Beyond look and feel, beyond user interfaces. Isolated in silos of user experience (UX), marketing, and product development, individual design functions may be reaching their limits.

What’s needed is a collaborative, immersive environment to work together. Design is not just an “IT thing” or a “marketing thing” or a “product engineering thing.” It’s an enterprise thing.​

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IPv6 (and this time we mean it)

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IPv6 (and this time we mean it)

​Internet Protocol is the foundation of networking, but we’ve run out of addressable space for addressable items. The more important it is for your business to connect with the outside world, the more important IPv6 is for your future–and the more urgent this issue is for you today.

IP addresses are woven deep into applications and infrastructure, and migration can bring challenges. While there’s no drop dead date for IPv6, the final IPv4 address blocks have already been allocated. Careful and proper adoption will take time for planning, execution, and verification. The time to start is now.

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Enablers for consumer products 

Technologies in which many CIOs have already invested time and effort, but which warrant another look because of new developments or opportunities.

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Finding the face of your data

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Finding the face of your data

Humans do some things really well, while computers are better at other things. It is this particular combination that enables the identification of new patterns and relationships across dimensions of data–structured and unstructured, internal or external, big or otherwise.

By combining human insight and intuition with machine number-crunching and visualization, companies can answer questions they’ve never answered before. More importantly, they can discover important new questions they didn’t know they could ask.

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Gamification goes to work

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Gamification goes to work

Gamification can encourage engagement and change employee, customer, and supplier behavior, creating new ways to meet business objectives. The goal is to recognize and encourage behaviors that drive performance–sometimes in unlikely places.

This trend has moved beyond hype and is already demonstrating business value. Gamification in the workplace incorporates social context and location services to motivate and reward desired behaviors in today’s mobile-social world.

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Reinventing the ERP engine

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Reinventing the ERP engine

If you could really get ERP cheaper and faster, what would you do differently? Run materials requirement planning (MRP) many times each day? Close the books in a matter of minutes? Optimize delivery routes on-the-fly in response to new orders, traffic or customer preferences? What would it mean for business agility, capability, and competitiveness?

ERP is no stranger to reinvention, overhauling itself time and again to expand functionality. But the underlying engine has remained fairly constant. That’s now changing.

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No such thing as hacker-proof

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No such thing as hacker-proof

If you could really get ERP cheaper and faster, what would you do differently? Run materials requirement planning (MRP) many times each day? Close the books in a matter of minutes? Optimize delivery routes on-the-fly in response to new orders, traffic, or customer preferences? What would it mean for business agility, capability, and competitiveness?

ERP is no stranger to reinvention, overhauling itself time and again to expand functionality. But the underlying engine has remained fairly constant. That’s now changing. 

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The business of IT

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The business of IT

Fragmented processes and systems can prevent IT from effectively delivering on the changing demands of the business. IT may need to transform its own management systems to keep up. Is this ERP for IT? Maybe someday.

Today, CIOs are crafting solutions from industry-leading products and testing business cases at each step. And the potential benefits are worth the investment–not only in driving down costs and better managing risks, but in positioning IT as the business partner in provoking and harvesting disruption in the post-digital era. 

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Consumer products

Learn about Deloitte's Consumer Products industry and key issues affecting the sector. 

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Pat Conroy

Vice Chairman & US Leader | Consumer Products

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Kim Porter

US Consulting Leader | Consumer Products

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Rich Nanda

Consumer Products Strategy & Growth Leader

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