Analysis

Property Index – Real Estate Prices

How Europeans Live and What It Costs Them

This study contains comprehensive information on selected European residential markets – how Europeans live and what it costs them.

Published in 2017

Revenues from apartment rentals in the Czech Republic fluctuate within the preferred range of 4 to 6%. The best yield can be gained in the city of Ostrava. On the other hand the least affordable own housing was for the first time observed in the Czech Republic where citizens need to save almost 11 years to buy a new apartment. Prices of new residential real estate in the Czech Republic are highest compared to the Central European countries, but their year-on-year growth was not as dynamic.

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Property Index 2017

Published in 2016

Compared to other Central European countries, the prices for new housing are the highest in the Czech Republic, however, Czechs are able to earn enough to pay for their new dwelling much faster than people in the rest of the countries. Whereas an average Czech needs an approximately 6.9 multiple of average gross annual salaries to buy a 70 square meter flat, an average Hungarian or Slovene needs more than 7 times the amount of average gross annual salaries and a Brit even 11 times the amount.

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Property Index 2016

Published in 2015

Although the prices of real estate in the Czech Republic are higher than in other Central European countries, they are among the most affordable in the region. On average, Czechs need 7.1 gross annual salaries to buy a new apartment of 70 square meters, in comparison with 7.2 gross annual salaries to be paid in Poland and even 7.8 gross annual salaries in Hungary. 

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Property Index 2015

Published in 2014

Residential real estate in CE countries and Portugal is noticeably cheaper than in WE countries. In our region, the prices of new apartments range from EUR 917 per square metre in Hungary to EUR 1,186 in the Czech Republic.

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Property Index 2014

Published in 2013

Despite a moderate decrease in prices in 2012, Prague remains one of the most expensive Central European cities, with a price for a new dwelling amounting to approximately EUR 2,500/m2.

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Property Index 2013

Published in 2012

The time Europeans with average income need to earn money to buy a new dwelling (70 m2) differs. While a multiple of 2.4 of the average annual gross income is needed to buy a new dwelling in Denmark, it stands at 9.1 in France.

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Property Index 2012
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