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Plotting a course for aviation finance, investment management and real estate after COVID-19

Weathering the storm

COVID-19 left few parts of the global economy untouched. The disruption has been widespread. As countries across the world went into enforced lockdown earlier this year to slow the spread of the virus, many business sectors had no choice but to go into a kind of suspended animation, while others remained active but at greatly reduced capacity. A fortunate few have thrived.

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Now, as economies start to reopen after Government restrictions ease, the scale of the challenges that lie ahead are starting to become clear. In this article, Deloitte Ireland experts look in depth at the implications for three elements of the financial services industry.

First, they examine the impacts for the investment management sector, at a time when liquidity is scarce and the outlook for earnings is soft. Next, we consider aviation finance – one of the most profoundly affected by the crisis. The industry comprises many different players, from airlines to banks and capital markets: How can each of them respond to a crisis of this magnitude? Next, we turn our attention to the real estate sector, which includes retail, industrial, office and residential markets. All four will feel the effects of the pandemic in different ways. Our experts examine where each sector has felt the impacts most deeply, and forecast what changes are likely in the short and long term.

Yet the changed environment also offers potential opportunities for those ready and able to act. Our commentators give guidance on how financial services providers can navigate the tricky passage to safer shores.

The following article, divided into three sections, assess COVID-19 implications for aviation finance, investment management and real estate in Ireland.

Read the full article in FinSight magazine here.

Explore ‘Plotting a course for aviation finance, investment management and real estate after COVID-19’ as part of FinSight magazine.
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