Docking the Amsterdam | Deloitte Impact Foundation

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Docking the Amsterdam

An ambitious, long-term project to transform a ship wreck into a public display on maritime history, global connections and colonial past

VOC-ship the Amsterdam is buried seven meters in the sand. It remains intact to this day, including its’ original cargo, awaiting to be uncovered together with all the stories it beholds. Read why and how the Deloitte Impact Foundation is involved in this project.

Docking the Amsterdam

Meet the Amsterdam, one of most important archeological shipwrecks from the 18th century. This ship was constructed by the Dutch East India Company (VOC) to trade and sail the world. A highly advanced ship of her time, that ran aground near Hastings (UK), due to a raging storm during her maiden voyage. Intriguingly, the hull, buried seven meters in the sand, remains intact to this day, including its’ original cargo, awaiting to be uncovered together with all the stories it beholds. These stories connect past, present and future in a way that brings to life the fundamental principles of her heritage: trade and profit, colonial exploitation -in all possible ways- and innovation. 

‘Docking the Amsterdam’ is an ambitious, long-term project to transform the wreck into a public display on maritime history, global connections and colonial past by displaying her in a large basin that serves as an underwater museum of living archaeology. 

Read more on www.dockingtheamsterdam.com and spot the ship on the beach at low tide via the live cam

Deloitte's involvement in the project

Deloitte has been involved in various phases of the project since 2015. Colleagues from Consultancy, Digital, Tax, Legal, Global Port Services and Risk Advisory are involved in the project in collaboration with the board of the foundation and project director Prof. dr. Jerzy Gawronski.

Christel Samson, Deloitte-lead of this initative, shares more about Deloitte's role in the project. Christel: 'We have developed the new website, have been drawing up the (on going) business case, supported the insights around customer journey for the program of the future museum, supported in several legal matters around the foundation, have been drafting the cultural code and the required WFT-procedure. At the moment looking with colleagues from GIS into the grants and incentive opportunities and with our colleague in London looking into the English required EIR (Environmental Impact Report) to be able to start the project.'

Project director Jerzy Gowronski adds: 'This project is not only about science and innovation, but also about how you can tell people about the past. This is where Deloitte Impact Foundation helps us. Without Deloitte, the project would not have come this far. This kind of project has never been done before, is both unique and complex and needs a strong strategic partner with both eminence and network.'

Our colleagues' experiences

Until now, over 20 Deloitte colleagues have shared their knowledge through the ‘Docking the Amsterdam’ initiative. Additionally, also external partners are involved in this project. Read their experiences via the articles below.

Perspective 1 | Can one still drink 269 year old wine?

Christel Samson, Director Deloitte Impact Foundation is the Deloitte-lead of this initiative. In this article, she shares why she started the project at the Deloitte Impact Foundation, what the project entails, how Deloitte contributes, and also some nice-to-knows. Read the article.

Perspective 2 | 17th Century VOC-ship sets course for an interactive future

Joey Duis, Senior Manager Deloitte Digital, believes that a unique project as ‘Docking the Amsterdam’ deserves a website as unique as the project itself. A case video, developed by Deloitte Digital, gives an impression of the website which even won a "Deloitte Awescar"! Read the article.

Perspective 3 | Children with drones in an underwater laboratory

Professor Jerzy Gawronski has been involved with the foundation that is doing archaeological research on the VOC ship the Amsterdam since 1982. In this article he tells us about the expected findings, challenges and the ultimate goal: bringing the VOC ship back to the Netherlands. Read the article. 

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