The economic impact  of incontinence in Australia

Analysis

The economic impact of incontinence in Australia

A rising cost

Deloitte Access Economics was commissioned by the Continence Foundation of Australia to investigate the economic impact and burden of disease of incontinence in Australia.

In 2010, there are around 4.2 million Australians aged 15 years and over living in the community with urinary incontinence, and 1.3 million with faecal incontinence. In total, 4.6 million people or 21% of the community population have urinary or faecal incontinence, or both. The prevalence rate is much higher in the Residential Aged Care (RAC) population where 70.9% or almost 129,000 residents have urinary or faecal incontinence (or both).

It is projected the number of people (aged 15 years and above) with urinary incontinence living in the community will rise to 5.6 million in 2030 and 1.8 million with faecal incontinence (6.2 million with any incontinence).

Deloitte Access Economics was commissioned by the Continence Foundation of Australia to investigate the economic impact and burden of disease of incontinence in Australia.

The analysis found that the total financial cost of incontinence (excluding burden of disease) in 2010 was estimated to be $42.9 billion, or approximately $9,014 per person with incontinence.

The monetary value of the burden of disease in 2010 is $23.8 billion. If this is added to the financial costs, the overall cost of incontinence is $66.7 billion in 2010, or approximately $14,014 per person with incontinence.

Published: August 2011

The economic impact of incontinence in Australia
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