The social and economic contribution of the Menzies School of Health Research

Analysis

The social and economic contribution of the Menzies School of Health Research

In 2015

Deloitte Access Economics models the costs and benefits of Menzies’ social and economic contribution to the Northern Territory, Australia and the Asia-Pacific.

2015 report

The Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) was established in 1985, with a vision to “improve health outcomes and reduce health inequity for populations in Australia and the Asia-Pacific region, particularly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, through excellence and leadership in research, education and capacity development”. 

This report updates a prior report commissioned by Menzies in 2012, that modelled the costs and benefits of Menzies’ social and economic contribution between 2002 and 2030 to the Northern Territory, Australia and the Asia-Pacific. In this report, Deloitte Access Economics analyses and documents Menzies’ contributions to these regions between 2002 and 2033.

The analysis found that across the Northern Territory, Australia and the Asia-Pacific, Menzies’ activities generated a total benefit of $1.1 billion, with a net benefit of $697.9 million and a benefit-cost ratio of 2.7. The impact of Menzies’ globally-recognised work in eliminating malaria in the region is clearly evident.

 

The social and economic contribution of the Menzies School of Health Research

2012 report

This assessment is to analyse and document the economic and social contribution of Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) to the Northern Territory (NT), Australia and the Asia Pacific using a quantitative approach.

This assessment, therefore, considers the impact of Menzies activities on economic activity, including employment impacts, knowledge and skills,health benefits, or policy and program improvements and commercialisation of research.

This analysis only considers the costs and benefits of Menzies activities period between 2002 and 2010.

Economic and social contribution of Menzies School of Health Research
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