hc-trends

Services

Human Capital Trends 2020: An Energy, Resources & Industrials perspective

The social enterprise at work: Paradox as a path forward

The 2020 Human Capital Trends focus on answering a paradoxical question: Can organizations remain distinctly human in a technology-driven world? In this Energy, Resources & Industrials (ER&I)–specific report, we’ll explore these trends from the lens of each of the industry’s sectors.

Our Trends are grouped into the three attributes of the social enterprise: purpose, potential, and perspective. Leading ER&I trends for each attribute are:

Purpose: Designing work for well-being

Living and performing at your best.

For an industry that focuses heavily on employee safety, it might be surprising to hear that the ER&I industry doesn’t always have a great focus on employee well-being. This comes with the acknowledgement that worker well-being is in fact very important—and has been brought further to the forefront by COVID-19.

Potential: Beyond reskilling


Investing in resilience for uncertain futures.

The ER&I industry faces a major challenge ahead as it is tasked to reskill workers to keep up with the future of work. With the fast-paced move toward the digital era, especially in light of the virtual demands of COVID-19, this capability becomes even more pressing as organizations begin to transition a traditional workforce into a digital environment.

Perspective: Ethics and the future of work

From “could we” to “how should we.”

As the ER&I industry is forced to accelerate into the future of work and face a digital transformation, it’s clear that many sectors are not well-prepared to manage the expected ethical dilemmas facing their people and other threats inherent in this new way of working. This is especially apparent after experiencing the demand of digital from COVID-19.

${column4-title}

${column4-text}

Industrial Products & Construction (IP&C)

Purpose: Designing work for well-being
Even with respondents rating this human capital trend as important or very important, the IP&C sector is still slow to address or adopt well-being activities. Executives may be keen to explore the role of organizations in driving well-being and the benefits this might unlock for optimizing business performance.

Potential: Beyond reskilling
Perhaps the most significant human capital trend for the IP&C industry is how to address reskilling the workforce with the constant change in business needs. If organizations can address barriers to identifying and prioritizing development needs, they may also address their ability to stay resilient in the face of uncertain futures.

Perspective: Ethics and the future of work
With the shift in work, careers, and AI technology, the IP&C sector may not be prepared for ethical issues posed by the future of work. Some unique questions challenge the status quo: Should organizational safety rules apply to employees when they are working from home? What should or should not change?

Mining & Metals

Purpose: Designing work for well-being
It should come as no surprise that safety is the primary focal point in this sector’s scope of well-being. While there are opportunities for organizations to introduce and showcase mental health initiatives and discussions, this sector may also explore an incentive structure for reporting incidents.

Potential: Beyond reskilling
It’s clear that the mining and metals sector feels challenged to reskill the workforce with adaptable skills required to keep up with the ever-changing, digital-focused future. With a greater investment in and focus on the reskilling of the workforce instead of outsourcing for skills, organizations may realize benefits to stay resilient.

Perspective: Ethics and the future of work
Organizations are acknowledging the importance of ethics, but have very limited knowledge of how to approach such a topic, particularly as it relates to employee data. As the threat of work, tasks, and information becoming more automated and digitized looms, executives might turn their focus toward managing these challenges and mitigating ethical risks.

Oil, Gas & Chemicals (OG&C)

Purpose: Designing work for well-being
The OG&C sector continues to focus on safety, but can the sector adapt when employees desire a focus on holistic well-being—including mental health, family stability, and financial well-being? Doing so may present great opportunities to strengthen the link between worker well-being and organizational performance.

Potential: Beyond reskilling
The OG&C sector faces two major challenges affecting the reskilling of its employees: understanding which skills will stand the test of time and the ability to prioritize workforce investments brought on by the current economic landscape. Organizations who work through these restraints may increase their own resilience in the face of constant change.

Perspective: Ethics and the future of work
With COVID-19 forcing ER&I to accelerate into the future of work (FoW), the OG&C sector is acutely aware of ethical dilemmas facing its organizations. For example, as executives look to enhance their AI footprint as more employees are working remotely, the data and details of AI investments, particularly around who monitors the AI or who makes directional decisions, must be considered not only to comply with regulations, but also to build trust with the workforce.

Power, Utilities & Renewables (PU&R)

Purpose: Designing work for well-being
With COVID-19 at the forefront of current events, promoting well-being has been emerging within this sector in small, employee-focused programs. Even so, union standards of well-being, which are safety-focused, are still often the norm. If the industry can continue its focus on broadening well-being activities, workers may not only feel their best, but also perform at their best.

Potential: Beyond reskilling
In order to capitalize on advancements in technology, the PU&R industry must make an equivalent investment in developing its workforce. Focusing on this effort is a step toward development and growth for employees and resilience for the organization.

Perspective: Ethics and the future of work
Ethical matters related to the future of work in power and utilities will be defined by organizational responses to individual worker rights and the rapidly approaching impact that AI and automation’s convergence with people will have on ethical issues. Respondents overwhelmingly believe organizations are responsible for managing these concerns, which calls for a more agile HR department to intervene.

Back to top

Get in touch

Ron Harman

Ron Harman

Principal l Human Capital

Ron is a principal in the Deloitte Consulting LLP's Human Resource (HR) Service Delivery service line. He has more than 30 years of industry and consulting experience in planning and deploying integra... More

Jonathan Moore

Jonathan Moore

Consulting Managing Director

Jonathan is a managing director in the Human Capital practice at Deloitte Consulting LLP and Deloitte Digital. He has more than 20 years of experience in selling and delivering large, complex advisory... More

Victor Reyes

Victor Reyes

Managing Director

Victor is a manging director in Deloitte’s Human Capital practice, focused on helping organizations reimagine their people strategies and HR capabilities to deliver business results, enhance talent ex... More

Brad Denny

Brad Denny

Power, Utilities & Renewables Human Capital Leader

Brad is a principal in Deloitte Consulting and leads Deloitte’s US Human Capital practice for Power, Utilities & Renewables. Brad is also the local service area champion for Deloitte’s 400+ strong Chi... More