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One Young World

Empowering young leaders to drive positive societal change 

At the 2019 One Young World (OYW) Summit, two delegates from Deloitte Africa joined 2,000 high-potential young people from around the world to attend a four-day event that changes their lives forever.

Deloitte delegation to OYW

At the 2019 One Young World (OYW) Summit, two delegates from Deloitte Africa joined 2,000 high-potential young people from around the world to attend a four-day event that changes their lives forever.

At the One Young World (OYW) Summit, brilliant young talents get to hear and meet some of the world’s most inspiring, most influential individuals.

OYW is all about empowering young leaders to drive positive societal change through building lasting networks, learning, and engagement. Deloitte is a key OYW supporter and in October 2019 sent 50 of its own young talents to the Summit in London, as well as sponsoring 10 exceptional scholars.

This is what the delegates from Deloitte Africa had to say about their experience:

Carolyn Kamanzi, Uganda

“In a session called Helping, Not Helping, [Harry Potter author] JK Rowling told us how she had launched an organisation which brings light to the lives of children in orphanages, some of which have essentially become institutionalised child prisons. Many people volunteer; they pay money, they bring donations but these orphanages don’t always implement things; they don’t use the money for the right causes, sometimes they sell the things they’re given.

It was the most eye-opening session because of the two people Rowling brought with her, one from Haiti and the other from Kenya, who both grew up in orphanages. Their parents were alive but unable to care for them. They talked about how volunteers would come to visit and leave in the evening, leaving the child even sadder. You get visitors – you have hope and then when the visitors leave in the evening you have no hope for adoption, no hope for improvement. The point of Rowling’s foundation is to teach people that, while volunteering comes from a good place it’s not always helpful – and to show them how it can be helpful.

When you’re privileged, you don’t always look outside your own life. When you don’t experience hardship first-hand you often don’t think about it. OYW opened my eyes. Afterwards I felt a little bit guilty and very determined to do more in my community, outside my 9 to 5. I kind of hope that the guilt stays there so I can be pushed to do more.”

Carolyn Kamanzi, Uganda

Khaya Hlatshwayo, South Africa

“The opening ceremony was powerful. There were 191 countries represented at the summit; each had a flagbearer who walked in during the opening ceremony carrying their flag and putting it on the stage. It was great to see so many people supporting SA.

There were a lot of really touching stories. Like Kartik Sawhney, who was the first visually-impaired person from his country to study maths and science to Grade 11 and beyond. And now he’s helping other visually impaired people to do the same, using an online platform he’s developed.

You think you’re helping the world but after OYW I felt like I hadn’t done a single thing compared to these people. I have a new perspective on certain things. Having come from the summit, I’m a little bit braver. I need to support what I need to support vocally, publicly. In such a short space of time I saw so many people doing such amazing things and it made me realise, “We’re not alone. We just need to push this thing a little bit more”.

 

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Khaya Hlatshwayo, South Africa
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