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An industrial products and construction perspective: Human Capital Trends 2019

Reinventing industrial products and construction organizations around a human focus

The top human capital issues facing the industrial products and construction industry are arising in a whole new context: The social enterprise. The 2019 Global Human Capital Trends survey calls on organizations to move beyond mission statements and philanthropy to learn to lead the social enterprise—and reinvent themselves around a human focus.

Top human capital trends in industrial products and construction

Explore the findings from our 2019 Global Human Capital Trends survey from an industrial products and construction perspective. This year’s survey included more than 1,100 respondents from the energy, resources, and industrials sector across 100 countries—396 of which were industrial products and construction respondents from 60 countries.

The 10 individual trends in the 2019 report align to the theme of “Leading the social enterprise—Reinvent with a human focus”, and are organized around three futures: The future of the workforce, the future of the organization, and the future of HR. Of the 10 trends in the full report, four are of utmost importance to the survey’s industrial products and construction respondents—and digital technology is the common denominator among them all:

The future of the workforce

  • Leadership for the 21st century: The intersection of the traditional and the new

The future of the organization

  • From employee experience to human experience: Putting meaning back into work

The future of HR

  • Learning in the flow of life
  • Talent mobility: Winning the war on the home front

For more information on each trend, including specific discussions on how industrial products and construction organizations can put these trends into action, download the full report.

Leadership in the 21st century: The intersection of the traditional and the new

In the 2019 survey, three-quarters of industrial products and construction survey respondents said that 21st century leaders face unique and new demands: They must take a nuanced approach to pursuing traditional business goals and draw on critical new competencies—from leading through change to and understanding new technologies. Industrial products and construction companies should be developing skills and metrics today that will help their leaders effectively engage with external and internal stakeholders and manage the workforce of the future.

Man on crossroads

From employee experience to human experience: Putting meaning back into work

Improving what is often called the “employee experience”—building on an understanding of workers’ aspirations to connect work back to the impact it has on the organization and society as a whole—was rated as important by 82 percent of industrial products and construction survey respondents. However, only 39 percent acknowledged their organization’s readiness to understand and apply the concept. How can industrial products and construction companies develop a roadmap to refresh and expand the concept of “employee experience” to address the “human experience” at work?

employee experience

Learning in the flow of life

Learning is becoming more integrated with work, more personal, and shifting—slowly—toward lifelong models. However, many industrial products and construction organizations are behind in their efforts to understand and accommodate evolving learning needs and opportunities—85 percent of survey respondents ranked this trend highest in importance but just 42 percent indicated organizational readiness. An end-to-end digital roadmap can help align learning across the enterprise and incorporate new platforms and tools that facilitate experiential learning on the shop floor, on the road, and at home.

Man on stairs amid water

Talent mobility: Winning the war on the home front

As it’s likely to become increasingly difficult for industrial products and construction organizations to source and hire enough people with all the capabilities they may require, they must develop people internally to be able to thrive. Encouraging talent mobility—moving from one area to another versus moving up through the ranks in one area—can provide a cost-effective solution to future staffing challenges. Although 78 percent of industrial products and construction survey respondents said that talent mobility is an important human capital trend, just 39 percent acknowledged their organization’s readiness to address the issue.

Hands placing ladders to make ways

Get in touch

Declan Watson
Principal | Deloitte Consulting LLP
dewatson@deloitte.com
Ron Harman
Principal | Deloitte Consulting LLP
jharman@deloitte.com
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