The future of mobility in aerospace and defense

Perspectives

The future of mobility in aerospace and defense

Rapidly developing technologies in the future of elevated mobility

While flying cars may sound as if they belong in science fiction, rapidly developing technologies in aerospace and aircraft design seem to have brought them closer to reality—potentially helping to create a faster, cheaper, cleaner, safer, and more integrated transportation system. Below are a series of articles exploring autonomous aerial passenger vehicles and opportunities and challenges facing the next era of elevated mobility.

Future of elevated mobility

Major aircraft manufacturers, technology startups, and network operators are taking the business of urban aerial transportation seriously, and investors have already put hundreds of millions of dollars toward research and development. Despite the progress, there are various challenges to consider with respect to consumer acceptance, safety, regulations, infrastructure, and air traffic management.


There is an important and exciting dialogue occurring between industry players, leaders, and investors about the future of transportation. Innovative technology and consumer trends are changing the speed of development. It won’t be long before entirely autonomous and tailored systems will be ready to transport individuals by land and air. This series aims to map out what that transformative future will look like and how soon it will be a reality. 

Advanced air mobility: how can the United States achieve and sustain the leadership position?

John Coykendall, US & Global Aerospace & Defense leader at Deloitte Consulting LLP; and Robin Lineberger, principal at Deloitte Consulting LLP, discuss insights on the future of advanced air mobility (AAM) and how the United States can achieve and sustain the leadership position in AAM.

 

 

 

 

What are the key capabilities required to secure a global leadership position in AAM?

John Coykendall, US & Global Aerospace & Defense leader at Deloitte Consulting LLP: and Kerry Millar, principal at Deloitte Consulting LLP, discuss the key capabilities required to secure a global leadership position in AAM.

Operationalizing advanced air mobility

The advanced air mobility (AAM) industry could become mainstream in the 2030s. The industry has received substantial investments, and today, there are more than 200 companies worldwide that are developing electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) aircraft1 This report examines operating business models for companies involved in AAM operations to consider for passenger mobility. It also focuses on the various consumer segments that are likely to evolve and determine where the most significant opportunities lie. 

Technology and trends shaping the future of transportation

Blogs

  1. Ready for take-off: eVTOLs and the aviation ecosystem
    by Robin Lineberger, US and Global Aerospace & Defense leader
  2. The future of flight: Five things Canadians need to know
    by Gérald Faustino, Canada Aerospace & Defense leader

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